Fall and Food – September 2016 Kohano Newsletter

In this blog – 

  • What makes Fall special?
  • Food and Fall – a great pairing
  • News releases, what I’m working on, and more!

Read on!

carrot-cake-jam

Hi Avid Readers!

Happy Fall. Or Autumn. Or Harvest. I love this season almost as much as I love spring.  And winter and summer too – to every season, there is a purpose!

The term “fall” originates in the idea of falling leaves.  The greens of summer give way to brilliant colors as the tree chemistry changes.  Sugars break down when the days become shorter and nights turn cooler, altering deciduous leaves into their natural color state, the rich tapestry of reds, yellows and orange we all love to peep.  Jim Cantore at The Weather Channel did a great short video explaining more about this process – find it at http://bit.ly/2crlXY2.

“Autumn” is derived from a Latin term (with an Etruscan root) and was in common use by the 16th century.  This transition period between summer and winter is generally assumed to be late September through late December in the Northern Hemisphere, and the opposite, late March to late June south of the equator.  The term “harvest” dates back to old Germanic languages as the time of reaping, tying into the many harvest festivals at this time of the year.

Whichever label you prefer (and everyone does have a favorite), this is the time when the days become markedly shorter, the angle of the sun drops closer to the horizon, and (if you’re lucky) the temperatures turn cooler.  At my home above 45 degrees north (latitude), the sun seems to race across the living room floor, intruding further each day until it casts across the full room.  The dogs love it – more room to nap in the warmth!

And I love it too – nothing better than sitting with the windows open and a book in my lap, a light blanket to combat the chill of the breeze.  Hubby and I crunch those drying leaves underfoot when we take our walks, and the dogs can’t wait to explore the terrific smells that have been out of reach up in the branches for the long summer months.  The dozen-and-a-half varieties of Japanese maples are preparing to put on their annual show.  Pics next time!

What are some of your favorite things about the autumn season?  What books have you enjoyed recently and why?  Write me back at yvonne@yvonnekohano.com and I’ll share your thoughts in the next edition!  If you have questions for me, please drop me a quick email.  I’m eager to hear from you.  (Bonus: I regularly draw prizes like gift cards from those who ask questions or provide book and other recommendations.)

Thank you for being a supporter!  If there’s anything I can do to make your reading time with me more enjoyable, please get in touch!

Happy reading!  Yvonne

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Food and Fall – A Perfect Pairing!

<<SIGH>>  I love food.  I love eating it, cooking it, and preserving it.  That last part is a good thing because yes, yet again, we planted too many annual vegetables this year, and it appears to be a bumper year for our crops of apples.

On the veggie front, we planted half the number of zucchini mounds as we did last year.  In 2015, our neighbors didn’t answer their doorbells when we came calling with bags of green and yellow!  We thought we were more controlled this year, but evidently it doesn’t matter how few we have (only three), we still have LOTS to eat and process.

Ergo, this is the time of year for food preservation in our household.  Hubby sets up a canning station on the patio, and we make jams and butters and sauces and pickles.  Yes, pickles – out of zucchini!  A shot of two of our favorites, dills and bread-and-butters, lights up the column further down.

We also make pineapple zucchini, which is a simple concoction of pineapple juice and zucchini plus a few other things.  The zucchini still tastes like zucchini, but with a tangy sweet twist.  It’s wonderful to open that up for a shot of summer sunshine on a salad.

What else did we make this year?  Some of you might have run across my pics of the Purple Dragon carrots harvest.  We made carrot cake jam, along with carrot bread and carrot salads and carrot patties (like potato cakes, but with carrots – num!)  I have tomato sauce on the schedule for next week, along with apple butter.  I was going to make pear butter too, but we ate all of those as fast as they ripened!

Interested in some recipes?  Drop me an email and I’ll link them into the blog at www.gooseyourmuse.com.

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New Releases

Flynn’s Crossing Romantic Suspense:  Love’s Fiery Prescription and Love’s Fiery Resolution:  Four first responders – two sets of siblings in nascent love affairs – fight wildland arsons with multiple suspects, including one of their own.

Mind Web Psychological Thrillers:  Mind Stalked:  Hallucinations, or a killer’s reality? Only by learning the truth can Nico Sofianos save lives, but the price might be his sanity.  Blood may already coat his hands.

Goose Your Muse Tips for Creatives:  Four Steps to Being a More Creative You and Four Steps to Business Planning for the Plan-Phobic Creative:  Being creative can be the ultimate joy – or a disappointing challenge. This series is designed for creative types in any field, with advice on keeping the fun in our daily creative lives.

zucchini-pickles

What I’m Working on Now

Final edits for Mind Etched, the next book in the Mind Web series.  And Mind Tangled is coming along nicely – almost done with the first draft!

A new free prequel novella set in Flynn’s Crossing, about how wrong three blind dates can go.  A new seasonal novella featuring three of my favorite FC characters, Dane, Powers and Mandy.

Creatives, what topics would you like me to write about next in the nonfiction realm?  Keep an eye on my Facebook page for Goose Your Muse (find it here http://bit.ly/2cp0ABx) to vote on your preference.

To stay informed, follow me at www.YvonneKohano.com (fiction), www.GooseYourMuse.com (creativity tips),
and on Facebook and Twitter to learn what tickles me about being a writer.

 

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